The Importance of the Monroney Sticker

MonroneyStudies show nearly 90% of all prospective auto buyers start their research on-line.  It’s no wonder since everything from price to options to reviews and availability within your area can be found on the web.  But when your search narrows to one vehicle in particular, there is certain information you’ll only find by looking to the Monroney sticker.   Ever since the Automobile Information Disclosure Act penned by longtime Oklahoma Congressman Almer Stillwell “Mike” Monroney was passed in 1958 every new vehicle in the U.S. has been required to sport a “Monroney” sticker in either a window or the windshield.  The sticker will provide you with the following information about the vehicle:

  • Make
  • Model
  • Serial or Identification Numbers
  • Engine and transmission specifications
  • Standard equipment and warranty details
  • The final assembly point
  • The name, and the location of the place of business, of the dealer to whom it is to be delivered
  • The method of transportation used in making delivery of such automobile, if driven or towed from final assembly point to place of delivery
  • The Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP or “sticker price”) of the base vehicle
  • The MSRP of optional equipment installed on the base vehicle
  • The transportation charges for delivery of the vehicle to the dealer from the manufacturer
  • The TOTAL MSRP of all the above.
  • The EPA mileage estimates
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration crash test rating

Starting in model year 2013 look for the Monroney to include additional information about fuel economy, expected fuel costs and emissions ratings.

Again, the Monroney sticker is only required to be posted on new vehicles.  But if you bought a used car, you can still find the Monroney.  Visit http://researchmaniacs.com/VIN-Number-Lookup/WindowSticker.html and enter your vehicle’s VIN (Vehicle Identification Number, usually found on the driver’s side dashboard or on the driver’s side door post near where the door hinges to the vehicle).

Sources:  autopedia.com, www.nytimes.com, www.widipedia.com,

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